Wanezek, Jaekels, Daul & Babcock, S.C. Attorneys at Law — Founded 1908

Our History

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Our firm was founded in 1908, the longest continuously operated law firm in Green Bay. When Wanezek, Jaekels, Daul & Babcock, S.C. was founded in 1908 by M. E. Davis (a 1904 graduate of Marquette Law School) Green Bay was a small factory town perched on the banks of the Fox River. There was not yet such a thing as the Green Bay Packers, and the population of Green Bay was just 25,216. Theodore Roosevelt was the President of the United States and World War I was still many years away.

It says a lot about our firm and our attorneys that for over a century we've served our community and provided quality legal services to satisfied clients where no other firm has been able to do so. Our firm has persevered as Green Bay has transformed into a modern American city and our lawyers continue the long tradition of excellence that will see our firm and our relationships with our clients far into the future.

*Above photo is the present day location of our firm.

Wisconsin Timeline

Some events that have occured during our over 100 years in business:

  • 1908-1919
    • 1908: Wanezek, Jaekels, Daul & Babcock S.C. is formed.
    • 1908: Income tax amendment is adopted; first four-wheel-drive automobile invented in Clintonville.
    • 1910: Ole Evinrude designs the first successful outboard gasoline engine for boats.
    • 1912: The Wisconsin woman's suffrage referendum is rejected by male voters, 227,054 to 135,736.
    • 1917: State Capital is completed at a cost of $7,258,763.
    • 1918: 120,000 Wisconsin soldiers serve in World War I, 3,932 casualties.
    • 1919: Eighteenth Amendment (prohibition) is ratified, closing nearly 10,000 Wisconsin saloons and 137 breweries.
  • 1920-1929
    • 1920: Wisconsin becomes the first state to ratify the 19th Amendment (women's suffrage).
    • 1921: Green Bay Packers are founded.
    • 1922: Coldest recorded temperature in Wisconsin is recorded at Danbury, 54 degrees below zero on January 24. The record stands until 1996.
    • 1928: Frank Lloyd Wright announced that he would establish his own school of architecture. He takes in 60 students at his Taliesin homestead in Spring Green, Wisconsin.
    • 1929: University of Wisconsin Professor Harry Steenbock patents the process for the irradiation of milk and other foods to increase the vitamin D content.
    • 1929: Wisconsin laws for enforcement of Prohibition are repealed.
  • 1930-1939
    • 1933: Dairy farmers stage a series of milk strikes to protest low prices.
    • 1933: Wisconsin votes to repeal the 18th Amendment; 8,500 brewery employees return to work.
    • 1934: 65 major strikes occur in Wisconsin, and several strikers are killed. The most serious strikes occur at Kohler and Milwaukee.
    • 1934: A postcard of a man in bikini shorts inspires a Wisconsin-based Cooper's Inc. designer to invent Jockey Shorts, the first pair of briefs.
    • 1935: The first automatic clothes dryer is developed in Two Rivers by the Hamilton Manufacturing Company.
    • 1935: A lie detector is first used in court at Portage, WI.
  • 1940-1949
    • 1940: The Green Bay Packers become the 1st NFL team to travel by plane.
    • 1942: Dr. Ira Baldwin, plant bacteriologist at UW-Wisconsin, is selected to head U.S. biological warfare.
    • 1945: Wisconsin sends 375,000 soldiers to World War II, 7,980 casualties.
    • 1946: Wisconsin Progressive Party dissolves and joins the Republicans.
    • 1947: State Civil War debt of $1,183,700 is retired.
    • 1948: Two Milwaukee lawyers founded Manpower after they failed to find extra administrative help for an urgent legal brief. By 2009, the company has over 4,000 offices in 82 countries.
    • 1949: The first telephone answering machine is invented in Milwaukee by Joseph J. Zimmerman.
  • 1950-1959
    • 1950: Wisconsin sends 132,000 soldiers to the Korean conflict, 800 casualties; Joseph McCarthy begins hunt for Communists.
    • 1953: Braves baseball team moves to Milwaukee from Boston; UW football team loses to USC, 7-0, in the Rose Bowl.
    • 1955: The Old Milwaukee brand is first brewed by the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company of Wisconsin. It was the first beer brand launched exclusively as a "popular" beer.
    • 1957: Milwaukee Braves win the World Series, 4 games to 3, defeating the New York Yankees.
    • 1958: Milwaukee Braves lose the World Series, 4 games to 3, to the New York Yankees.
  • 1960-1969
    • 1967: Green Bay Packers win the first Super Bowl, defeating the Kansas City Chiefs.
    • 1967: Milwaukee racial riots break out; UW-Wisconsin demonstrations against the Vietnam War escalate.
    • 1968: First Wisconsin heart transplant is performed in Milwaukee; first successful bone marrow transplant at UW-Wisconsin.
    • 1968: Green Bay Packers win their second consecutive Super Bowl, defeating the Oakland Raiders.
    • 1968: Vince Lombardi resigns as coach of Green Bay Packers, two weeks after winning Super Bowl II. He remains as general manager.
    • 1969: National Guard is ordered to control student riots at UW-Madison.
  • 1970-1979
    • 1971: Milwaukee Bucks win the NBA championship, defeating the Baltimore Bullets.
    • 1971: Merger of the University of Wisconsin and the State University systems takes place
    • 1976: US District Court orders integration of Milwaukee public schools.
    • 1977: Constitutional amendments authorize raffle games and revise the structure of the court system by creating a Court of Appeals.
    • 1978: William Steiger, congressman from Wisconsin, leads a drive to reduce the capital gains tax rate from nearly 50% to 28%. In 1999 this was credited by Brian S. Wesbury in "The New Era of Wealth" as one of the factors that contributed to the economic boom of the 1990s.
  • 1980-1989
    • 1981: Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co., "The Beer that Made Milwaukee Famous," closes.
    • 1982: State unemployment figures are highest since the Depression years.
    • 1982: Milwaukee Brewers lose the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals.
    • 1985: Herb Kohl, Milwaukee businessman and later US Senator (1988), purchases the Milwaukee Bucks basketball team.
    • 1986: Drinking age is raised to 21.
    • 1988: Gov. Michael S. Dukakis wins in Wisconsin's Democratic presidential primary; on Republican side, VP George Bush overwhelms his opposition.
    • 1988: Chrysler Corp. closes the automobile assembly plant in Kenosha, the nation's oldest car plant.
  • 1990-1999
    • 1990: More than 1,400 Wisconsin soldiers are called to serve during the Persian Gulf crisis - 11 casualties.
    • 1997: Green Bay Packers win their third Super Bowl, defeating the New England Patriots.
    • 1997: Monona Terrace convention center opens 60 years after Frank Lloyd Wright unveiled the plans.
    • 1998: Green Bay Packers lose to the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl.
    • 1998: UW-Madison's James Thomson is first scientist to grow a colony of human embryonic stem cells.
    • 1998: Wisconsin celebrates its sesquicentennial (150 years in existence).
    • 1999: UW football team wins the Rose Bowl, defeating UCLA.
  • 2000-2009
    • 2000: Gov. Tommy Thompson is appointed Secretary of Health and Human Services by president George W. Bush.
    • 2000: UW football team becomes the first Big 10 team to win consecutive Rose Bowls, defeating Stanford.
    • 2001: The first cloned lamb in North America is born at Infigen in DeForest.
    • 2002: To the boos of disappointed fans, the All-Star game in Milwaukee finishes in a 7-7 tie after 11 innings, when both teams run out of pitchers.
    • 2003: Harley-Davidson celebrates its 100th anniversary in Milwaukee with a parade of 10,000 motorcycles. Some 250,000 bikers pack the roads around Milwaukee for a 3-day celebration.
    • 2008: Brett Favre retires from the Green Bay Packers.
  • 2010-
    • 2010: The Packers defeat the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in Super Bowl XLV. Aaron Rodgers is named Super Bowl MVP.
    • 2011: The Wisconsin Supreme Court reinstates Gov. Walker's plan to all but end collective bargaining for public workers.
    • 2011: Fourteen Democratic lawmakers disappear as the state Senate is about to begin debating a measure by Gov. Walker eliminating collective bargaining for most state public employees. Protesters fill the Capitol for a third day.
    • 2012: Rep. Tammy Baldwin beats former Gov. Tommy Thompson in the WI Senate race.
    • 2014: The new WIS 29/US 41 Interchange opens to traffic.